Nicaragua’s tumultuous political history reflects the dramatic impacts that differing perspectives on property rights and resource governance can have on the structure and performance of societies and economies. The Somoza regimes that governed Nicaragua from 1936 to 1979 emphasized the primacy of private property rights and the pursuit of an export market-oriented, large-scale commercial agriculture. These policies resulted in an economy in which rural land ownership was concentrated in the hands of relatively few Nicaraguans who operated farms producing coffee, cotton, sugar, tobacco, and beef for export, largely to the United States.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Nicaragua

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

Measurement unit: 
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24 March 2017
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STORY HIGHLIGHTS
  • Only 30% of the world’s population has a legally registered title to their land.
  • As discussed at the Land and Poverty Conference 2017, secure land rights are important for reducing poverty and boosting shared prosperity at the country, community, and family levels.
  • The World Bank supports countries to secure land rights for their populations, especially women, Indigenous Peoples, and other vulnerable groups.

27 January 2017
Nicaragua

By:Malva Izquierdo

Date: 27 January 2017

Source: Reuters

Three decades after Nicaragua launched the first of many reforms aimed at giving women equal land rights, experts say rural women remain exploited and open to disinheritance, violence and abuse.

Many women are locked out of land - first by a father then by a husband - while others say they are treated worse than the animals they tend. Yet all this was supposed to end decades ago.

Nicaragua

From the Nicaragua Center for Community Action (Nicca)

Date: 25 September 2016

Source: Havana Times

 

The Rama-Kriol peoples, a small, indigenous group living on the Caribbean Coast of Nicaragua, are among some of the most vulnerable people in the world. They live in fear of loss of their land and cultural identity and of an uncertain future because they are in the path of a proposed mega-project—the Nicaragua Trans-Oceanic Canal, a potential environmental and economic disaster.

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