Land Rights Implications of COVID-19 | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data
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About Landesa

Landesa partners with governments and local organizations to ensure that the world’s poorest families have secure rights over the land they till. Founded as the Rural Development Institute, Landesa has helped more than 105 million poor families gain legal control over their land since 1967. When families have secure rights to land, they can invest in their land to sustainably increase their harvests and reap the benefits—improved nutrition, health, and education—for generations.

The Land Portal is a Foundation registered in the Netherlands in 2014.

The vision of the Portal is to improve land governance to benefit those with the most insecure land rights and the greatest vulnerability to landlessness through information and knowledge sharing.

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As a service provider in the field of international cooperation for sustainable development and international education work, we are dedicated to shaping a future worth living around the world. We have over 50 years of experience in a wide variety of areas, including economic development and employment promotion, energy and the environment, and peace and security. The diverse expertise of our federal enterprise is in demand around the globe – from the German Government, European Union institutions, the United Nations, the private sector, and governments of other countries.

New America

Since 1999, New America has nurtured a new generation of policy experts and public intellectuals. Today we are a community of innovative problem-solvers, combining our core expertise in researching, reporting and analysis with new areas of coding, data science, and human-centered design to experiment and innovate nationally and globally. We prize our intellectual and ideological independence and our diversity, seeking to do our best work and to reflect the America we are becoming.

 

Our Work

 

Environmental Peacebuilding

Environmental peacebuilding integrates natural resource management in conflict prevention, mitigation, resolution, and recovery to build resilience in communities affected by conflict.  Join our new Environmental Peacebuilding Association comprising researchers, practitioners, and decision makers to share experiences and lessons from managing natural resources in conflict-affected settings, access new research on the topic, and participate in events to support the growing network of professionals active in environmental peacebuilding.

 

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LANDac, the Netherlands Academie on Land Governance for Equitable and Sustainable Development, is a partnership between Dutch organizations working on land governance. The partners are the International Development Studies (IDS) group at Utrecht University (leading partner), African Studies Centre, Agriterra, the Sociology of Development and Change (SDC) group at Wageningen University, the Land Portal Foundation, HIVOS, the Royal Tropical Institute (KIT), the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and Enclude Solutions.

Housing, Land, and Property Area of Responsibility

GLOBAL LEVEL COORDINATION

The Norwegian Refugee Council (NRC) has been leading the Housing, Land and Property (HLP) Area of Responsibility (AoR) since 2016.  Globally, the membership of the HLP AoR includes UN agencies, NGOs, research and academic institutions, donors, human rights and development agencies, and representatives of other AoRs and global clusters.

As governments press pause on economic activities and people change their work and social behaviors to halt the spread of COVID-19, there are several hidden dimensions that can put pressure on land governance and management and threaten the land rights security of millions worldwide. The response to the pandemic has unfolded like a slow-moving natural disaster, disrupting the daily pattern of our lives and revealing stressors on our institutions. And like a natural disaster, how countries and communities prepare – both before and after a catastrophic event – can be the difference in long-term prospects for resilience and recovery. 

What steps can individuals and communities take to ensure they have the right to retain or return to their land and productive assets? How will COVID-19’s impact on the global food systems affect countries that rely on food imports? How can governments maintain land administration amid the disruptive nature of the pandemic? How will immigration and internal migration contribute to the “de-urbanization” of cities and increase demand for land in the countryside? What are the impacts of covid-19 on housing? What are the gender dimensions of land rights in households where shelter orders are changing social behaviors?

This online discussion will unite all threads of the preceding webinars on Women’s Housing and Land Rights and Covid-19, Eviction response during and after COVID-19 and Migration, Displacement, and De-urbanization in the Context of COVID-19, and will bring in contributions from panelists of the three webinars. The discussion seeks to develop a set of actionable recommendations to policy makers, as well as practical recommendations based on what is happening on the ground. The discussion aims to identify both short term and longer term actions that can effectively contribute to supporting land governance stakeholders facing an ongoing pandemic, while looking forward to post-pandemic priorities. The discussion will respond to a series of statements and set of questions to challenge the statement, challenging participants to respond to those statements.

If you are interested in participating in the discussion, please contact us at hello@landportal.info.

The Land Rights and COVID-19 webinar and discussion series is presented by Land Portal, Landesa, the Global Protection Cluster HLP AOR and GIZ, with organizing support from Environmental Peacebuilding Association, LANDac, New America and the UK's Department for International Development (DFID). 

Comments

Thank for organizing this platform for discussion that is comming up soon. 

I look forward to fruitful discussion. 

Benjamin Barkollie

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