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11 September 2020
Authors: 
Michael Brown
Africa
Latin America and the Caribbean
Asia
Global

The global conservation community now faces the added challenge of Covid-19 on top of a longstanding set of complex conservation, sustainability, and development challenges. In the wake of this pandemic, return to business as usual is not a viable option. The existing systems and structures upon which conservation is based must evolve. Climate change, biodiversity conservation, and poverty elimination efforts have been further complicated by Covid-19, with the brunt of the pandemic borne most acutely by the poorest and most vulnerable.

IRENE NYANGASI, RURAL WOMAN IN KENYA WHO NEEDS HELP TO SECURE HER LAND CAN NOT BE REACHED
21 April 2020
Authors: 
Mr. Israel Bionyi Nyoh
Africa

Platforms struggle to support communities to secure their land rights and develop agriculture

When the new coronavirus (COVID-19) arrived Africa in January 2020, governments announced draconian measures to contain its spread, including restricting movement and association.

How Anna Letaiko got her land
30 April 2020
Authors: 
Ezekiel Kereri
Tanzania

Anna Letaiko is a middle-aged woman with a soft voice that carries wisdom and strength. Her husband is an older man, and together they live in small mud house in Mundarara – a remote village in Longido district in Tanzania, accessible only by a rough dirt road. It is a Maasai community similar to the one in which I grew up, except that the community’s livelihood is based on mining and pastoralism while my community still depends on farming and pastoralism.

I met Anna through my work with WOLTS – a five-year action research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities that are affected by mining. As a speaker of the Maasai language, my job is to facilitate and translate in training sessions and help develop training materials.

In Maasai culture, it is very rare for women to own land. Men see themselves as owning land on behalf of the whole family. If women do apply for land, they usually apply in the name of their husband or son. 

However, the law in Tanzania (Land Act, 1999, and Village Land Act, 1999) grants women and men the same rights to land access, ownership and control. The law also says that women have the same rights in decision-making over land. What Maasai customs mean in practice is that women are denied the right to apply for land and own it themselves. 

During our research we heard that, when women in Mundarara applied for land in their own names, their applications were ignored, not taken seriously, and even thrown away. Some women were even asked for sex in exchange for land documents.

Our aim through the WOLTS project is to support the community to find their own solutions to land rights problems. To help them achieve this, we asked them to select community ‘champions’ who would be trained in land rights, mining laws, investment laws, mineral valuation and legal procedures for licence applications, as well as gender-based violence. 

Anna was one of the first champions to be trained in Mundarara. When we first started working in the community, Anna did not even know that she had the right to own land.  After the WOLTS training sessions, she put in an application, and it was taken seriously. 

A few months later, Anna received a small plot near the village centre where she wants to build a modern house. As a trained champion for gender equity, she has promised to help other women by raising awareness and assisting them to become land owners like herself.

The growth of artisanal mining in Mundarara has brought many changes to the community, including giving families new sources of income. Women are finding that they have more opportunities to earn money and participate in community and family decision-making, including through land ownership. 

Documenting and sharing Anna Letaiko’s story reminded me how quickly life is changing in pastoral districts due to factors like mining. I hope it will inspire readers, raise the voices of less fortunate groups, and improve everyday life in communities similar to my own.

 

A Miskito woman in Nicaragua. Photo: Jason Taylor/ILC.
22 April 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Michael Taylor
Global

This is a special Earth Day Op-Ed by Michel Forst, the UN special rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders and Michael Taylor, the Director of the International Land Coalition Secretariat.

31 March 2020
Authors: 
Emmanuel Mbise
Tanzania

As a Swahili speaker from Tanzania, I have not often had the opportunity to meet or work with people from remote Maasai communities. However, I recently visited the villages of Naisinyai and Mundarara in the north of the country as part of a global research project on women’s land rights in pastoral communities affected by mining (the WOLTS project).

5 February 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Marc Wegerif
South Africa

The Parliament of South Africa has agreed to amend the Constitution of the country in order to make it explicit that it is possible to expropriate land without paying compensation in order to further land reforms. The supporters of this move - the ruling  African National Congress (ANC) and the opposition Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) – argue that this is necessary to speed up land reforms in order to overcome the continuing extreme and still largely racially defined inequalities in land ownership.

Maasai herder on the flooded Mundarara road, northern Tanzania
30 January 2020
Authors: 
Dr. Elizabeth Daley
Africa
Tanzania
Asia
Mongolia
Global

I write this blog as our project team embarks on a fifth year of work on women’s land tenure security (WOLTS) with pastoral communities in mining-affected areas of Mongolia and Tanzania. Just before Christmas 2019, we were in Mundarara village in northern Tanzania. Exceptionally heavy rains made getting around much more challenging than usual. Locals travelling on foot had to make wide detours to avoid getting bogged down in waterlogged grazing land, and it took everyone much longer to get to the village primary school for our long-planned training day. 

Behind high-rise buildings and skyscrapers hides poverty and inequality in urban Angola
27 January 2020
Authors: 
Antonio Inguane
Angola

Will skyscrapers one day represent the prosperity that every Angolan citizen has dreamed about? Perhaps.

From the Middle East to North America, high-rise buildings and skyscrapers are cropping up as a symbol of wealth and prosperity in global cities. Modern Africa has experienced unprecedented urban growth and embraced zoning regulations and reforms that incentivize high-density growth and mixed-use buildings in major metropolitan areas. 

During my recent trip to Luanda, the capital of Angola, the first thing that caught my attention was the city’s skyline.

21 November 2019
Authors: 
Mr. ODENDA LUMUMBA
Africa

Next week the Conference on Land Policy in Africa - Winning the Fight against Corruption in the Land Sector: Sustainable Pathway for Africa’s Transformation, will take place in Abidjan. The African Union recognises that corruption is a key factor hampering efforts at promoting governance, socio-economic transformation, peace and security, and the enjoyment of human rights in the Member States.

Strengthening Land Rights Will Curb Migration
24 September 2019
Authors: 
Chris Jochnick
Central America
Mexico
United States of America

What the US faces on its southern border is not a security problem, but a humanitarian crisis, and punishing attempts at deterrence cannot resolve it. Enabling people to stay where they are requires, first and foremost, strengthening their right to be there.

Pixabay
23 August 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Nathan Lobel
Global

The climate crisis will reshape our relationships to land around the world. Journalist David Wallace-Wells warns that, once the planet warms 2°C above preindustrial levels — the target set by the Paris Agreement — “major cities in the equatorial band of the planet will become unlivable,” and 400 million more people will suffer from regional water scarcity.

Blogs

Events

Discussions

Organizations

The Alliance For Food Sovereignty in Africa (AFSA) is a Pan African platform representing small holder farmers, pastoralists, hunter/gatherers, indigenous peoples, citizens and environmentalists from Africa who possess a strong voice that shapes policy on the continent in the area of community rights, family farming, promotion of traditional knowledge and knowledge systems, the environment and natural resource management.

The Amerindian Peoples Association (APA) is a non-governmental Indigenous Peoples organisation in Guyana. It is primarily an advocacy organisation that seeks to promote and defend the rights of the Indigenous Peoples of Guyana. 

Membership of the APA is made up of Units throughout the country, currently amounting to close to eighty such units. The Association is led by an Executive Committee comprising the President, Vice-President, Secretary, Treasurer, Assistant Secretary/Treasurer, thirteen regional representatives, a women’s representative and a youth representative. 

Independent platform for registering and administering legally-acquired use and benefit rights over land in Mozambique

cclaf
O Centro de Cultura Luiz Freire (CCLF) é uma organização não governamental de direitos humanos, que surge em 1972, a partir de um grupo que buscava a restauração da democracia, através de atividades culturais e projetos de desenvolvimento comunitário, durante o período autoritário da Ditadura Militar brasileira.

Localising the Economy through Sustainable Co-operative Enterprise

Co-op Culture is a co-operative consortium of co-operative and community advisors, entrepreneurs and enterprises.  Our members and associates have a vast and varied experience of supporting co-operative, community and social enterprise to start and grow.

We deliver the following support and services:

COLANDEF LAND AND PROPERTY RIGHTS

COLANDEF is a non-governmental organisation established, registered and operating in Ghana since November 2004. 

We aim at improving land governance and the management of natural resources; enhance local governance systems; and better gender mainstreaming besides policy advocacy.

MISSION

Community Development Association (CDA) is a highly secular, non-partisan-non-Government Development Organization (NGDO) established in the year 1985-1986 in North Western Part of  Bangladesh CDA gradually has been shifted its strategic position from charity to a Right based Organization now facilitating among the poorest, landless and marginal farmers along with the plain land indigenous people (IP) including the differently able men, women &youth with a view to empower, ensure and secure access to land Rights from its inception.

UPA DI s’est donnée pour mission de soutenir la ferme familiale comme modèle d’agriculture durable en appuyant les organisations professionnelles agricoles démocratiques, les systèmes collectifs de mise en marché des produits agricoles et toute autre initiative structurant l’avenir de l’agriculture dans les pays en voie de développement.

CBU

Motto

The motto of the Copperbelt University is "Knowledge and Service" . Enshrined in the motto are the following strands:

UFS

Editora UFS (Editora UFS)

A Editora UFS, composta pelo Conselho Editorial e pela Coordenação Gráfica, tem como missão atuar na divulgação da produção cultural e científica tanto da comunidade universitária quanto da sociedade como um todo. Através do lançamento periódico de editais e da publicação de obras avulsas, esta Editora tem realizado um trabalho de divulgação de obras científicas e culturais produzidas por autores sergipanos e do restante do Brasil.
 
Front Line Defenders

Front Line Defenders was founded in Dublin in 2001 with the specific aim of protecting human rights defenders at risk (HRDs), people who work, non-violently, for any or all of the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights(UDHR). Front Line Defenders addresses the protection needs identified by HRDs themselves.

“Observing, Analysing, Acting” under this motto Germanwatch has been engaged since 1991 for global equity and the preservation of livelihoods. The politics and economics of the North, with their global consequences, stand at the centre of our work.

The situation of marginalised people in the South form the starting point for our engagement for sustainable development. The political and globalised market structures of the North, as well as their resource-intensive mode of production, which is now being increasingly imitated, are influencing human lives worldwide.

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