Land & Corruption related Blog post | Land Portal | Securing Land Rights Through Open Data

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18 July 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Nicole Mathot
Global

Sexual extortion is a pervasive but often hidden form of corruption. Instead of money as a bribe, sexual favors are extorted in exchange for the provision of services or goods. This degrading abuse of power also touches the land sector, but remains largely hidden and unaddressed.

Village in rural Malawi (©Lorenzo Cotula)
18 July 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Liam Wren-Lewis
Malawi

The distribution of land in Malawi is highly unequal and frequently inefficient. Large areas of land are underutilised in a context where many Malawian farmers would be able to put such land to productive use. In this context, the Malawian government has been slow and ineffective in undertaking land reforms, despite large demand for change both from investors and the local population.

The role of open data in fighting corruption
18 July 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Laura Meggiolaro
Global

Hundreds of land practitioners from around the globe gathered and came together at the 2019 LANDac Conference at the beginning of July with the purpose of looking at land governance from the lens of transformation and in particular, how to support transformation that works for people and nature.  The conference delved into questions such as the long-term dynamics around land, water and food production and promising concepts and tools for building learning and knowledge building about these dynamics.

28 May 2019
Authors: 
Dr. Konrad Hentze
Africa
Mozambique
Zambia
openfield
23 May 2019
Authors: 
Mr. Tim Davies
Global

This week an important new book on ‘The State of Open Data: Histories and Horizons’ was launched by IDRC and African Minds.

2 December 2016
Kenya
Ivory Coast
Nigeria
Senegal
Global

In February of this year, a deportation officer of the United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency was indicted for extorting immigrants for cash and sexual favors. Arnaldo Echevarria promised two undocumented women “working papers” in exchange for sex, eventually impregnating one of them.

This is just one example of the many cases of sextortion that vulnerable women, and sometimes men, face around the world.

Plant nursery in Yangambi, DRC. Photo by Axel Fassio/CIFOR
5 November 2018
Authors: 
Joseph Feyertag
Dr. Julian Quan
Global

Commercial agriculture has driven land use changes and not only affected millions of hectares of forested land, but also farmers’ and local people’s land rights. Efforts to combat deforestation are at the forefront of the international aid agenda, and clarifying and securing land rights is important for its success.

Global Witness: Find the fact, change the story, expose the system.
26 September 2018
Authors: 
Gillian Caldwell
Global
We are facing challenges in our collective efforts to ensure that land rights are respected around the world. We are fighting the odds with ever more powerful companies and governments surrounding us. And these forces are all too often working in collusion to drive business forward with a profit at any price mentality  -- and at the expense of human rights and the environment.
When Defending the Land Becomes a Crime
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Ms. Moira Birss
Latin America and the Caribbean
Guatemala
Mexico
Ecuador
Peru
Global

BERTA CÁCERES, ASSASSINATED in her home in March 2016, was just one of hundreds of Latin American environmental activists attacked in recent years. At least 577 environmental human rights defenders (EHRDs) were killed in Latin America between 2010 and 2015 – more than in any other region. In addition to violence, EHRDs suffer legal threats and harassment, severely impeding their work. Before Cáceres' murder, she faced trumped-up charges due to her opposition to hydroelectric dams on her indigenous community's territory.

 

Maria in Brazil - Land Defender
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Ben Leather
Honduras
Mexico
Brazil
Colombia
Philippines

“It is up to me to follow in the same footsteps as my father walked, so that they’ll give us back our land again.” 

- Ramón Bedoya, Colombia

 

“The desire for justice and reparations for the fallen defenders, for their families, and above all that this never happens again—that is an energy that compels you to keep working.”

– Isela González, Mexico

 

“The owner of the plantation… should give back our land… It’s not just for our family but the rest of the people living in the area. My father offered his blood. He gave his life. We will continue.”

Alfred Brownell
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Alfred Brownell
Liberia

A CLASSIC RESPONSE from governments and businesses in recent time is not just to characterize legitimate grievances by Indigenous Peoples and local communities as anti- government, anti-development, and anti-investment. They are waging wars against Indigenous Peoples and individuals who are protecting the planet and its people by criminalizing their legitimate grievances and then threatening, arresting, intimidating, and imprisoning those who dare challenge this mode of development. 

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CurbingCorruption.com is a new website providing practical help for public officials and politicians planning anti-corruption reforms.

We provide you with two tools

A practical five-step approach – summarised in the left side bar – helps you develop your own anti-corruption initiative, large or small.  The Steps can be accessed at any time from the top navigation bar.

Front Line Defenders

Front Line Defenders was founded in Dublin in 2001 with the specific aim of protecting human rights defenders at risk (HRDs), people who work, non-violently, for any or all of the rights enshrined in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights(UDHR). Front Line Defenders addresses the protection needs identified by HRDs themselves.

Global Witness exposes the hidden links between demand for natural resources, corruption, armed conflict and environmental destruction

Mission

Many of the world’s worst environmental and human rights abuses are driven by the exploitation of natural resources and corruption in the global political and economic system.  Global Witness is campaigning to end this. We carry out hard-hitting investigations, expose these abuses, and campaign for change.  We are independent, not-for-profit, and work with partners around the world in our fight for justice.

To achieve our Goal, we are campaigning for an unprecedented mobilization of Indigenous Peoples and local communities, governments, intergovernmental organizations, corporate and other private sector actors, civil society, social movements, and citizens from all over the world. To realise the change we want, we ask that by 2020…

Our Mission

The Open Society Foundations work to build vibrant and tolerant societies whose governments are accountable and open to the participation of all people.

We seek to strengthen the rule of law; respect for human rights, minorities, and a diversity of opinions; democratically elected governments; and a civil society that helps keep government power in check.

We help to shape public policies that assure greater fairness in political, legal, and economic systems and safeguard fundamental rights.

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REPOA was formed in 1994 in Tanzania with the mandate to contribute to the alleviation of poverty in its multiple dimensions through research and capacity building. Over time, REPOA’s mandate has expanded beyond alleviating poverty to encompass growth and socio-economic transformation for poverty reduction.

REPOA’s STRATEGIC PLAN FOR 2015-2019

SDI is complrised of grassroots activists using technology to hold the Liberian government & corporations to their commitments.  

The Gecko Project is an investigative journalism initiative established to shine a light on the corruption driving land grabs and the destruction of tropical rainforests. It seeks to create and maintain a sense of urgency over the role of large land deals, predominantly for food production, in some of the most pressing global challenges: climate change, the collapse of biodiversity, food security, and the rights of indigenous peoples and other rural communities. We aim to achieve this through the production and promotion of in-depth, high-quality and accessible journalism.

About

One global movement sharing one vision: a world in which government, business, civil society and the daily lives of people are free of corruption.

In 1993, a few individuals decided to take a stance against corruption and created Transparency International. Now present in more than 100 countries, the movement works relentlessly to stir the world’s collective conscience and bring about change. Much remains to be done to stop corruption, but much has also been achieved, including:

From villages in rural India to the corridors of power in Brussels, Transparency International gives voice to the victims and witnesses of corruption. We work together with governments, businesses and citizens to stop the abuse of power, bribery and secret deals.

As a global movement with one vision, we want a world free of corruption. Through chapters in more than 100 countries and an international secretariat in Berlin, we are leading the fight against corruption to turn this vision into reality.

Corruption Watch is a non-profit organisation launched in January 2012. We rely on the public to report corruption to us. We use the reports as an important source of information to fight corruption and hold leaders accountable for their actions.

At U4, we work to reduce the harmful impact of corruption on society. We share research and evidence to help international development actors get sustainable results.

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