Access Denied: Land Rights and Ethnic Conflict in Burma - Burma Policy Briefing | Land Portal

Resource information

Date of publication: 
December 2013
Resource Language: 
ISBN / Resource ID: 
MLRF:1466
Pages: 
1-16

ABSTRACT ORIGIN UNKNOWN: This report provides a recent update on land policies in the ethnic regions of Burma following the 2010 national elections and the beginning of the ceasefire with the Karen National Union in 2012. The authors argue that, while military conflict and associated abuses have declined, the Burmese government’s commitment to foreign investment and export-led economic growth is making traditional land tenure even less secure than before. The authors point out the importance of confronting the myths supporting land expropriation for industrial enterprises, and they also provide a rationale for supporting subsistence agriculture and indigenous land rights. Finally, while some scholars may advocate for the development of a private property land titling process to safeguard Karen people’s land rights, the authors of this report suggest that such action could make land tenure even less secure by reinforcing the idea that land rights are contingent on a piece of paper. Rather, the authors advocate for recognition of communal land rights under Karen customary law.

Authors and Publishers

Author(s), editor(s), contributor(s): 

Transnational_Institute, (TNI)

Corporate Author(s): 

The Transnational Institute (TNI) is an international research and advocacy institute committed to building a just, democratic and sustainable world. For more than 40 years, TNI has served as a unique nexus between social movements, engaged scholars and policy makers.

The Transnational Institute (TNI) is an international research and advocacy institute committed to building a just, democratic and sustainable world.

Founded in 1974 as a network of ‘activist scholars’, TNI continues to be a unique nexus between social movements, engaged scholars and policy makers.

Data provider

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