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Acronym: 
JLAEA
Journal
Focal point: 
Managing Editor, the Journal of Land Administration in Eastern Africa, Ardhi University P O Box 35176 Dar es Salaam

Location

Ardhi University
P O Box 35176 Dar es Salaam
Dar es Salaam
Tanzania
TZ

The Journal of Land Administration in Eastern Africa (JLAEA) is publication of the Land Administration Unit that was set up at ARU in November 2009. JLAEA mirrors the aspirations of the Land Administration Unit at Ardhi University (ARU) whose mission is to ensure quality education and training, research, scientific publications, information dissemination, documentation and public services through integrated cross disciplinary team work in land administration. In November 2011, Ardhi University agreed to a suggestion by the newly established Eastern African Land Administration Network  (EALAN) to make the Journal, a property of the network. The EALAN  comprises of universities conducting education and training in land administration in Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Rwanda.

 

Purpose of the Journal
The evolving need for a multi-disciplinary approach in land administration has been well captured by the United Nations institutions drawing experiences from different countries across the globe. In East Africa, land administration is increasingly becoming a crosscutting discipline and no longer limited to the mundane land allocation and use control enforcement processes. It is more diverse and anchored in information communication technology and democratic institutional systems within the land sector. For training institutions such as Ardhi University (ARU), the challenge has been to train the new brand of land administrator who will have to work with the single-discipline trained land sector specialists.

 

The Journal of Land Administration in Eastern Africa (JLAEA) is publication of the Land Administration Unit that was set up at ARU in November 2009. JLAEA mirrors the aspirations of the Land Administration Unit at ARU whose mission is to ensure quality education and training, research, scientific publications, information dissemination, documentation and public services through integrated cross disciplinary team work in land administration. In November 2011, Ardhi University agreed to a suggestion by the newly established Eastern African Land Administration Network (EALAN) to make the Journal, a property of the network. The EALAN comprises of universities conducting education and training in land administration in Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda, Ethiopia and Rwanda

Journal of Land Administration in Eastern Africa Resources

Displaying 1 - 10 of 34
Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Burundi

In the framework of collaboration for country based case studies on land and natural resource tenure security in Eastern and Southern Africa by the University of Nairobi/ Centre for Urban Research and Innovation, a case study was conducted in Burundi. Data collection was based mainly on literature review of legal texts and all studies realized in the area of land tenure and natural resources in Burundi, and field visits. This paper presents only the synthesis of the information and data collected on land, water, mines and forests.

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Reports & Research
July 2015
Eastern Africa

A compendium of four doctoral theses on land administration. 

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Reports & Research
July 2015
Eastern Africa

Proceedings of 7th Eastern Africa Land Administration Network (EALAN) Annual General Meeting (AGM) and Workshop Theme:The State of Land Administration in Eastern African Countries: Comparative Overview Venue: Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Date: 21st – 22nd July 2015

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Tanzania

Review of the advantages and disadvantages of the current Tanzania Tide Gauge (TG) vertical Datum (VD) has revealed that some of the problems cannot be solved to conform to the Satellite geodesy era timely and cost effectively. The current VD is costly and uneconomic. By changing to a Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) compatible VD, most of the problems of the current Tide Gauge-Vertical Datum (TG-VD will disappear and thus boost greatly economic and social prosperity.

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Ethiopia

Land is a cross-cutting theme in most contemporary development challenges. Contemporary literature shows that land governance benefits the broader administration and governance of society. Tools enabling evaluation of land governance, however, are often focuses on national or supranational levels. Ethiopia provides a case in point: rapid urbanization and urban poverty are an issue; however, limited studies assess urban land governance from a multi-stakeholder perspective. Citizens and government representatives at different levels are the sources of information.

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Rwanda

Securing women land rights through land titling programs is viewed as a potential means for enhancing their tenure security. The expectation is that women may gain greater influence on how to use the land, if they are registered as joint owners. Women are more likely to make decisions that improve food and nutrition needs at farm level than men. Increased level of women decision making through secured tenure rights is expected to have a positive impact on food security.

 

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Tanzania

Flexibility in dwelling units allows for easy and economical physical change and adaptation of spaces for the changing circumstances and needs of the dwellers over the life of the dwelling. However, the knowledge on how dwelling units in multi-family housing respond physically and programmatically to the changing spatial needs of dwellers is still limited.

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Journal Articles & Books
July 2015
Tanzania

The Road Selection Model was developed for the purpose of transportation improvement in informal settlements that minimises demolition of houses and compensation costs required in roads widening. The need of the model was to guide and support decision makers on challenges of widening narrow roads for accessibility and mobility improvement as part of upgrading informal settlements.

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