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The Land Portal at CFS 46
15 November 2019
Authors: 
Ms. Laura Meggiolaro
Kenya
Brazil
Global

At CFS 46, the Land Portal had the opportunity to be the co-organizer of the side event How the VGGT have changed rural women’s lives:  Key strategies and innovations towards gender equality together with GLTN Unit UN-Habitat, the Cadasta Foundation and the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO). This side event brought together a range of experts who illustrated efforts aimed at ensuring women’s land rights through both formal institutions and customary systems.

RegularizationBonito
27 August 2019
Authors: 
Mrs. Patricia Maria Queiroz Chaves
Brazil

For the first time, women from informal settlements in the Municipality of Bonito, State of Pernambuco, Brazil will be granted with land titles in which they have lived in for decades

Rural Recife Brazil
16 May 2019
Authors: 
Mrs. Patricia Maria Queiroz Chaves
Brazil

Over the last 2 years, a bottom-up SDGs monitoring process has been developing in the municipalities of Caruaru and Bonito to give women tenure security. 

Caruaru and Bonito are located in the semi-arid region of Pernambuco state in northeast Brazil, where grassroots women have been supported by Espaço Feminista,a civil society organization dedicated to women’s economic and political empowerment through public policies. 

8 March 2019
Brazil

A data story from women in a semiarid region of Brazil

*This story was written by the following women: Ducicleide Maria da Silva, Gigliola Silva Araújo, Ianka Sayonara da Silva, Josefa Ferreira da Silva, Maria do Carmo da Conceição Carvalho, Maria Karoline Policarpo Silva, Manuella Donato, Mariana de Albuquerque Vilarim and Thalya Carla Vieira de Lima and Patricia Maria Chaves .  It was translated by Sonia Jay Wright.*  

17 October 2018
Authors: 
Mrs. Patricia Maria Queiroz Chaves
Latin America and the Caribbean
Brazil

“Land for me is life.”
“It is everything, it is health, food security, and dignity.” 
“It is life, overcoming adversity, and land security.”
“[Land for me is…] achievement and sustainability.”
“It is our home, where we raise our children, and where we preserve our culture.” – What does land mean for you? (2015)

 

Women farmers use sticks to make holes in the soil for seeds, on a farm near Pangalengan, West Java, Indonesia, May 9, 2018. REUTERS/Darren Whiteside
28 September 2018
Authors: 
Lukasz Czerwinski
Africa
Tanzania
Latin America and the Caribbean
Brazil
South-Eastern Asia
India

In a saturated marketplace, food and beverage companies too often avoid addressing land rights issues.

Maria in Brazil - Land Defender
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Ben Leather
Honduras
Mexico
Brazil
Colombia
Philippines

“It is up to me to follow in the same footsteps as my father walked, so that they’ll give us back our land again.” 

- Ramón Bedoya, Colombia

 

“The desire for justice and reparations for the fallen defenders, for their families, and above all that this never happens again—that is an energy that compels you to keep working.”

– Isela González, Mexico

 

“The owner of the plantation… should give back our land… It’s not just for our family but the rest of the people living in the area. My father offered his blood. He gave his life. We will continue.”

The Alliance of Indigenous Peoples of the Archipelago (AMAN)
7 September 2018
Authors: 
Andrew Anderson
Guatemala
Honduras
Mexico
Brazil
Colombia
Philippines
Global

FRONT LINE DEFENDERS has documented 821 human rights defenders (HRDs) who have been killed in the four years since we started producing an annual global list in cooperation with national and international NGOs. Seventy-nine percent of this total came from six countries: Brazil, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, and the Philippines. The vast majority of these cases have never been properly investigated, and few of the perpetrators of the killings have been brought to justice.

5 June 2018
Authors: 
Mrs. Patricia Maria Queiroz Chaves
Brazil
Global

A Q&A with Patricia Chaves from Espaço Feminista, Brazil, explains the discrepancies in accessing property and inheritance rights for women in Brazil as well as data that helps to inform grassroots women about their rights.  The piece also provides powerful accounts of women's personal experiences.  

Traditionally, small ‘Pygmy’ communities moved frequently through forest territories, gathering a vast range of forest products, collecting and exchanging goods with neighboring settled societies. © Selcen Kucukustel/Atlas
Global
Brazil
Colombia
Malaysia
India

By  Lewis Evans, Survival International

For Earth Day (April 22), Survival International reveals some of the amazing ways in which tribal peoples are the best conservationists and guardians of the natural world:

1. The Baka “Pygmies” have over 15 words for elephant

The Baka people know so much about elephants, they have different words for them according to their sex, age and even temperament.

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