Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center | Page 2 | Land Portal
logo-catie.jpg
Acronym: 
CATIE
Phone number: 
(506)2558-2000

Location

CATIE Headquarters 30501 Cartago
Costa Rica
CR
Working languages: 
English
Spanish

The Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center (CATIE) is a regional center dedicated to research and graduate education in agriculture, and the management, conservation and sustainable use of natural resources. Its members include Belize, Bolivia, Colombia, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Venezuela, the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) and the State of Acre in Brazil.

Tropical Agricultural Research and Higher Education Center Resources

Displaying 6 - 9 of 9
Library Resource
Institutional & promotional materials
November, 2010
Indonesia, Nepal, Thailand, Vietnam, South-Eastern Asia

As negotiations on the shape of REDD+ continue at national and global levels, REDD-Net’s network of civil society organizations has identified the issue of trust as a high priority for further examination. In this issue RECOFTC explores the importance of trust in REDD+, why the success of REDD+ depends on trust, and how trust may need to come with its own set of warnings.

Library Resource
Policy Papers & Briefs
January, 2010
Global, South-Eastern Asia

Thousands came together in "Hopenhagen" from 7-18 December 2009 for what was the most covered and talked about of any United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNF CCC) Conference of the Parties (COP) to date. Reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation in developing countries (REDD-plus)1 was one of few issues on which progress was made. However, implications of the wider negotiations for REDD-plus are not yet clear.

Library Resource
Institutional & promotional materials
October, 2009
Nepal, Vietnam, South-Eastern Asia

This bulletin draws on country-level experience to share civil society perspectives on the challenges, opportunities, and possible approaches for pro-poor REDD. As governments begin to formulate their national REDD programs, questions are emerging about the role of local people in design and implementation, and the socio-economic implications for the rural poor. Drawing on experiences from Nepal and Vietnam, this bulletin includes:

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