Guinea photo DFAT

Guinea is characterized by high political and economic instability, which is one of the reasons why GDP in the country has been stagnant since 2002, with poverty increasing. Of the total land area, agricultural land comprises 51%, with 86% of the poor population living in rural areas and more than 70% of the population working in the agriculture sector.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Guinea.

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

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Guinea

 

Representatives from Guinea's ministries of Energy and Water, Agriculture and Urban and Rural Planning will meet in Conakry on 4-5 March to discuss reforms to the way land is expropriated for large public interest infrastructure projects and how displaced smallholder farmers should be compensated.

29 October 2018
Guinea

Efforts to Improve Oversight of Mining Need to Benefit Affected Communities

Earlier this month, looking out over the vast swathes of barren red land that make up a fast-growing bauxite mine, I witnessed first-hand the rapid growth of Guinea’s bauxite mining boom. Bauxite from Guinea is used to produce aluminum used around the world in automobile and airplane parts and consumer products like beverage cans and tin foil.

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La GWI en Afrique de l'Ouest est mise en œuvre par un consortium constitué par IIED et l'UICN, et travaille principalement dans cinq pays : le Burkina Faso, la Guinée, le Mali, le Niger et le Sénégal.

Le travail de la GWI en Afrique de l'Ouest est guidé par la vision et la mission de la GWI au niveau mondial. En effet, toutes les régions de la GWI s’efforcent d’engendrer un changement significatif par le biais d'un plaidoyer et d'initiatives politiques intégrés pour:

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Natural Justice: Lawyers for Communities and the Environment is a non-profit organization, registered in South Africa since 2007.

Our vision is the conservation and sustainable use of biodiversity through the self-determination of Indigenous peoples and local communities.

Our mission is to facilitate the full and effective participation of Indigenous peoples and local communities in the development and implementation of laws and policies that relate to the conservation and customary uses of biodiversity and the protection of associated cultural heritage.

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