Chad is the fifth largest African country, with a population of about 11 million people, 73% of them living in rural areas and 27% in urban areas. The country is rich in oil resources and in recent years it experienced an increase of revenues thanks to the oil production. However, Chad remains one of the poorest countries in Africa.

Learn more about successes and challenges and find more detailed land governance data in Chad.

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Total population is based on the de facto definition of population, which counts all residents regardless of legal status or citizenship--except for refugees not permanently settled in the country

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Written by Thierry Berger and Lorenzo Cotula from IIED, this short report summarises comments and recommendations on the draft land Code in Chad (January 2014 version). In addition to an analysis of the draft Code in light of international trends, this note draws on earlier reports concerning the draft Code prepared by Tearfund partner Entente des Eglises et Missions Evangéliques au Tchad (EEMET) (2014) and by Tearfund (2015).



This research aims to critically evaluate the current draft of a new land code in Chad. In January 2014, the government of Chad presented Tearfund and four of Tearfund’s partners with a draft of the proposed new land code and requested constructive feedback. Research was undertaken in response to this request and is presented here.


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ASF serves the most vulnerable people waiting for justice

ASF intervenes in countries where human rights are not respected, where political violence and armed conflict reign, and where legal rules are flouted.  Justice in those countries, too often arbitrary, does not guarantee the security of the population.  Conflicts are not satisfactorily resolved before the local courts.  People whose rights have been abused tend to resort to vigilante justice, which evolves into the law of the strongest or richest, and contributes to a climate of violence.

Governmental institution

Chad, part of France's African holdings until 1960, endured three decades of civil warfare, as well as invasions by Libya, before peace was restored in 1990. The government eventually drafted a democratic constitution and held flawed presidential elections in 1996 and 2001. In 1998, a rebellion broke out in northern Chad, which has sporadically flared up despite several peace agreements between the government and insurgents. In June 2005, President Idriss DEBY held a referendum successfully removing constitutional term limits and won another controversial election in 2006.

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